Don King, on Mike Tyson


"Why would anyone expect him to come out smarter?
He went to prison, not to Princeton."



"To me, boxing is like a ballet, except there's no music
and the dancers hit each other."

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Head Injuries: Boston University Study Finds Link Between Brain Damage and Repeated Concussions - Massachusetts Injury Lawyer Blog

  December 3, 2012

Head Injuries: Boston University Study Finds Link Between Brain Damage and Repeated Concussions

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In a new study, Boston University School of Medicine researchers autopsied the brains of deceased athletes who suffered repeated concussions and found the majority showed signs of a degenerative brain disorder called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

The researchers autopsied 85 deceased brain donors, including 82 athletes. This included 34 professional football players. Researchers found a buildup of an abnormal brain protein called tau in 68 brain donors. By contrast, they autopsied 18 brains with no known trauma and found no protein buildup. Tau is associated with CTE, a degenerative condition linked to memory loss, depression and dementia.

The autopsies found the most extensive brain damage in the professional athletes who died after age 50. They experienced the most severe memory loss and personality changes in their final years.

The football players included National Football League (NFL) Hall of Famers running back Ollie Matson and Colts tight end John Mackey. Both died last year after suffering from dementia.

The researchers also described the four stages of CTE. In the first stage, the injured individual experiences headaches and trouble concentrating. Symptoms progress to depression, aggression and short-term memory loss, followed by serious cognitive impairment and dementia.

Last spring, more than 3,000 former players filed a lawsuit against the National Football League, claiming the league hid information about football-related head injuries. The NFL claims the head injury lawsuits have no merit and asked a federal court in Philadelphia to dismiss more than 100 injury claims, saying they should be resolved through the NFL's collective bargaining process rather than the courts.

Many states, including Massachusetts, have also implemented laws in recent years which mandate concussion training for high school athletes and provide rules for how long students must sit out after a head injury.

The research was reported in the journal Brain.


Source:
Head Injuries: Boston University Study Finds Link Between Brain Damage and Repeated Concussions - Massachusetts Injury Lawyer Blog


 LINK:  http://www.massachusettsinjurylawyerblog.com/2012/12/head-injury-study-boston.html






1 comment:

tayfre said...

This is an interesting topic but at the same time I think it is pretty common sense. Of course repeated concussions is going to have a long term negative effect on your brain. Football players should know this ahead of time. Other states should follow after MA footsteps and teach players at a young age, like when they are in high school, of what to do after a concussion. Thank you for sharing and hopefully this sheds some light on such a tragic topic.

Boston lawyer